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Caring for Horses

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Caring for Horses

A 20 hour short course in the essentials of caring for horses. This online course is ideal for people who are new to caring for horses and need to know the basics of horse care.

Whether you are purchasing your own horse or considering a new career working with horses, this course is an ideal place to start. Ensuring that you are taking proper care of your horse is important for optimal health and a content friend. There are so many important factors that you need to consider for taking care of horses and this course will help you on your way to a rewarding and healthy relationship caring for horses.

You can pace yourself with this course. Take your time, or study quickly, it is completely up to you. There are online tests and also further research that you can do along the way. If you need assistance or have questions, you can also contact our tutor email who will guide you in the right direction. You can test how you have progressed with a final online exam. 

 

The Lessons

Lesson 1 BREEDS AND IDENTIFICATION
Introduction 
Breeds 
Review what you have been learning

Lesson 2 ANATOMY, PHYSIOLOGY AND MOVEMENT 
External Points of the Horse
Skeletal & Muscular Systems
Cardiovascular System 
Review what you have been learning

Lesson 3 DIGESTIVE SYSTEM AND FEEDING 
Overview of Digestive System
Food 
Feeding Routines and Procedures
Review what you have been learning

Lesson 4 HORSE HANDLING 
Basic Horse Psychology, Temperament and Behaviour 
Safe Handling
Vices and Problem Behavior 
Lesson 4 additional reading
Review what you have been learning

Lesson 5 HEALTH MANAGEMENT 
Introduction to Horse Health
Internal Parasites 
Skin Conditions
Equine Colic
Lameness
Contagious Respiratory Conditions – Viruses, Bacteria, Parasites 
Non-Contagious Respiratory Conditions 
Preventative Health Care Programs
Review what you have been learning

Lesson 6 SHOEING THE HORSE 
Why do horses need shoes?
Types of shoes 
Steps in shoeing the horse 
Accidents associated with shoeing
General Foot Care
Review what you have been learning

Lesson 7 CARE OF THE HORSE AT GRASS
Grazing Requirements
Grazing Management
Review what you have been learning

Lesson 8 CARE OF THE STABLED HORSE 
Stabling Facilities
Stable Yard Safety
Bedding & Mucking Out
Feeding & Watering Overview
Grooming
Review what you have been learning

Lesson 9 SADDLERY & EQUIPMENT 
Saddles
Bridles
Bits
Ancillary Equipment 
Review what you have been learning

Lesson 10 THE EQUINE INDUSTRY 
What Do People Do With Horses? 
Buying & Selling a Horse – Scope of the Industry
Common Equine Careers 
Review what you have been learning

Final Assessment

 

The Caring for Horses short course will help you understand basic and all of the essentials of horse care.

This course can be a great platform for either caring for your own horse or for gaining valuable knowledge in equine care to start a career working with horses.

Support along the Way from Experts

You have access to expert tutors through our student help desk all the time you are studying this course. Our school maintains help desks in both of our offices -in Australia and the UK; and has staff on duty five days a week manning phones, online chat and emails. Any questions that you have about what you are studying will be dealt with promptly (usually the same working day, often immediately).

    If there is something you read or research that you don't understand, ask for help.
    If you want to learn more about something you encounter through these studies, have a conversation with one of our faculty tutors
    If you need direction to find more information, ask
    If you need advice on moving forward with your work, career or studies after the course ask. (Free career and business advice).

 

 

 

LEARN ABOUT DIFFERENT WAYS TO KEEP HORSES AND ALL THAT ENTAILS

There are three different ways of keeping horses:

  1. At grass - all day and night.
  2. Stabled all day and night except for brief exercise and/or grazing periods.
  3. The combined system  a lengthy amount of time in both a stable and a paddock.

At Grass has it's Advantages

It is often thought that keeping a horse at grass is the easiest system to adopt. Although grass kept horses do not take up as much time as stabled horses, it certainly isn't simply a case of "throwing them into the paddock and forgetting about them"! Being at grass is natural for the horse when the size of the pasture is vast. Most modern grass kept horses, however, are restricted to small paddocks. The standard of management must be high to ensure that grass kept horses and their paddocks stay healthy.

Some types of horses are better suited to being at grass than others. The pony breeds do very well on poor pasture grazing whilst some thoroughbreds cannot tolerate the cold and wet, together with inadequate food supply associated with being out at grass. Breeding herds can do well at grass; the mare's milk production is stimulated whilst the youngsters benefit from the sunshine, fresh air and exercise. Horses that are not being worked for any length of time should be put out to grass to prevent boredom and stable vices occurring. Ponies are most healthy if kept at grass and are easier for the young owners to manage. Ponies can become very gassy (excitable) when stabled. In this lesson we are going to consider a horse who is kept at grass and is ridden regularly. Horses that are resting at grass will receive the same attention but will not be fed for work or groomed.

The Combined System may be Considered Better

The combined system is a very good way of keeping horses for the following reasons:

It is a happy compromise between the two extremes of keeping a horse at grass all the time (best for the horse) and keeping it stabled all of the time (best for the rider). The combined system works well for the horse and rider.

The horse's diet and exercise can be controlled. Although a grass kept horse is usually very healthy, he can only be used for gentle out rides and is not fit for fast, hard work. He is said to be in "soft condition". For a horse to be in "hard condition" or fit, he must be fed a high protein diet and undergo a well planned program of exercise. His access to grass where he will eat and exercise “at will” must be reduced.
The grazing can be conserved. Horses are greedy eaters and will graze what grass is available to them. To make the grazing go further it is a good idea to limit the number of hours grass is grazed. This is possible with the combined system.

Horses can be given shelter from extreme weather. Horses can withstand more cold than man and are quite comfortable in cold, dry weather. They suffer if it is very cold and wet, and also extreme heat. With the combined system, horses can be kept in when weather becomes too extreme.

Horses can be protected from biting insects. Flies can make horses very miserable, and can cause loss of condition (the horse loses weight). Some biting insects can transmit deadly diseases. Examples include Tick paralysis, Trypanosomiasis, African Horse Sickness, Equine Infectious Anaemia, Equine Viral Encephalomyelitis, Anthrax. With the combined system, horses can go out to graze when there is less threat from biting insects.

Horses can be protected from thieves. It is easier to protect horses against theft if they are stabled, watchdogs and alarms can be used.

 

WHO THIS COURSE MIGHT HELP?

  • Anyone considering buying a horse
  • Horse owners who have never studied them formally studied horse care
  • People working or hoping to work in the equine industry
  • People considering more extensive equine studies may use this as a taster course
  • Graduates in animal sciences or agriculture who missed out studying horses may use this as a "filler"  course to fill in knowledge they missed studying; or refresh knowledge they have forgotten.

 



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Caring for Horses Caring for Horses
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